La précarité énergétique, une des problématiques incontournables de notre siècle... 9

Translating the new Canada

At one point or another, every Canadian will be asked: “Are you from English Canada or French Canada?”

There are many misconceptions about the Great White North, our multilingual tongues being among the biggest.

First, there is a misunderstanding that all Canadians speak French.

Unfortunately, no. There are measures in place to ensure Canadian students are exposed to their second official language. It is mandatory for students between the grades 4 to 8 to take second language classes, and optional immersion programs. However, many students discontinue their second language learning after 8th grade. Even if students continue taking second language classes until high school graduation, the chances retaining what they’ve learned into adulthood is very slim without constant education and exposure. All of Canada is bilingual, albeit at varying degrees. Some Canadians are able to hold intelligent debates in both official languages, whereas others can barely utter “bonjour” with confidence. Nevertheless, English and French hold equal power across the land, and Canadians can be served in either official language.

Then, there is the polar opposite that French is only spoken in Québec, or that French is the only language used in Québec.

On the opposite end of the spectrum is the belief that Quebec is the only francophone part of Canada. While it is the most famous and the biggest francophone province, this belief neglects strong francophone communities in the other twelve provinces/territories. What many foreigners don’t know is that not only is French the official language of the entire country, but is recognized as the official language for four other provinces/territories besides Quebec. There are many prominent francophone communities in every province, as there is large number of Anglophones in Quebec.

English and French are the only languages spoken in Canada.

While officially English and French are Canada’s official languages, they are not its first nor only languages. Over 60 indigenous, 200 immigrant, and handful of Canadian dialects and mixed languages are still alive and thriving in parts of Canada.

Indigenous languages

According to the most recent census, nearly half a million Canadian reported they spoke an indigenous language. While this isn’t an overwhelming number against Canada’s total population of 35million, the preservation of languages are impressive. While many immigrant languages get replaced by English or French with each generation, many families with indigenous tongue keep their language alive in the home. Although the statistic varies depending on the language, 90~97% indigenous speakers use their mother tongue at home.

Immigrant languages

1/5 of Canadians have a mother tongue other than French or English, according to 2011 census. Depending on the region, it isn’t uncommon to see advertisements, signs, or announcements be made in a third language. As a country built on immigration and multiculturalism, Canada’s languages reflect this.
For example, take Coquitlam, British Columbia, the mid-size suburban city in Metro Vancouver where I grew up. Here, the immigrant to non-immigrant population is almost at par. In fact, the top three working languages in the city are English, Chinese, and Korean. French trails in at #4, but significantly behind: Korean to French ratio is 10:1.

Not surprisingly, this is reflected in day-to-day life: many supermarket signs read English, Chinese, and Punjab, advertisements read only in Chinese, and free translation services are offered for school report cards. The Coquitlam school district was one of the first in Canada to introduce a Mandarin Bilingual Program for its youngest pupils. Similar to French immersion programs, students take half of their curriculum in English and the other half in Mandarin.

This system of third language-official language immersion program are not unique to Mandarin nor to B.C. In Manitoba, Ukrainian-English immersion program has been established much earlier. And all across Canada, students can also study a minority language such as Punjab, Arabic, and even Scottish Gaelic.

Canadian dialectes and langages

Canadian Languages (1)

These are just some of the languages and dialects, unique to Canada. Although this map doesn’t identify the exact location of where these languages are spoken, it illustrates the general idea. The east coast has abundance of dialects and unique languages adopted from original European immigrant languages. In the Praries, there are languages like Michif and Bungee, which take indigenous tongues and borrow English or French words or syntax.
What does this all mean?

Canada is a country found on immigration, and its openness to other languages and cultures is undeniable. There is a growing effort and attention to “bi/multi-lingualize” its youngest citizens. As more Canadians adopt second or third languages, so will their businesses.

What languages can your business speak? Let us help you: https://www.alltradis.com/

Information for this article has come from:

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


 

La précarité énergétique, une des problématiques incontournables de notre siècle... 5

Famous Translators/Interpreters | #ALLTRADISt9nDay 5

September 30 of each year is International Translation Day. This year, we are celebrating International Translation Day with ten themes highlighting this industry. Some will be funny, others heartwarming— we hope to generate discussion about a field focused on being undetectable, and interest even non-translators and interpreters to join the conversation. You can follow our updates on Twitter @ALLTRADIS or follow our discussion by following #ALLTRADISt9nDay.

Thupten Jinpa
the Dalai Lama’s English interpreter

Dalai Lama Visits Seattle To Start US TourEven the most interpreters at European Parliaments admitted that the Dalai Lama is one of the toughest speakers to interpret, due to the subtlety and different nuances words carry. Thupten Jinpa has been the Dalai Lama’s principal English translator since 1985. He has had a long history with the Dalai Lama, even before Jinpa’s accidental beginning to interpretation/translation work. Jinpa is a Montreal-resident, Mcgill-educator, philosopher, author, and former monk. To hear more about Jinpa’s experience and view on interpretation, listen to this interview.

Interview: http://www.onbeing.org/program/translating-dalai-lama/235 .

 

Amber Galloway-Gallego
Kendrick Lamar’s sign language interpreter at Lollapalooza 2013

Amber G-GGalloway-Gallego is a professional music to American Sign Language interpreter. She is best-known for her very enthusiastic and hilarious interpretation of rapper Kendrick Lamar’s show at Lollapalooza music festival in 2013. Her fame shed light to a growing community deaf concert-goers around the world. She explains her process, which steers clear of word-for-word interpretation, but adds the emotional, or sass, or the general je ne sais quoi element into music interpretation. You can watch an interview of her explaining her craft and process, and also watch her Youtube channel, where she interprets Kendrick Lamar and other songs.

Her Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/1stopforasl
Interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LgHNcjYp7sE

Jack Jason
Marlee Matlin’s sign language interpreter

Jack JasonPossibly the most popular or recognized interpreter of all is actress Marlee Matlin’s voice, Jack Jason. Jason has been Matlin’s sign language interpreter for more than 25 years, and has been by her side on the set of the West Wing and Celebrity Apprentice. Jason animated enthusiasm and quick pace adds another dimension of personality to Marlee Matlin. You can read about his interview here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/nataly-kelly/meet-jack-jason-the-most-_b_901712.html

 

 

Valentin Berezhkov
Joseph Stalin’s German and English interpreter

Conversations informal meeting in the studyBerezhkov was educated as an engineer, but had picked up English and German from his parents. He was recruited while working in the navy, when during a peace pact talk between Soviet Union and Germany made in 1939, the Berlin embassy was short of interpreters. Without formal training and experience, Berezhkov was thrown into his diplomatic career, attending meetings with history makers like Hitler, Stalin, Churchill and Roosevelt, and being privy to highly valuable, top secret information. Even after the war, Berezhkov led an interesting international life.

You can read more about his life on his obituary: http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/obituary-valentin-berezhkov-1190576.html.

 

Edith Grossman and Gregory Rabassa
Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s translators

Greg Rabassa Edith GrossmanGarcia Marquez was never hesitant to give his translators the credit they deserve. He once gave the greatest compliment to the “One Hundred Years of Solitude” translator, George Rabassa, claiming he preferred the translated work to his own. He is also quoted many times giving high praise to “Love in the Time of Cholera” and “Strange Pilgrims” translator, Edith Grossman. It is safe to say that Garcia Marquez’s fame and popularity in the Anglophone world owes thanks to Grossman and Rabassa.

 

 

 

 

 

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us